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Book Features Four "World-Changing" Alumnae

Changing Our World: True Stories of Women Engineers, a book due out this month, will feature four Clark School alumnae: Mary Lacey, B.S. ’78 mechanical engineering; Norine Walker, B.S. ’81 urban studies and ’83 civil engineering; Anh Duong, B.S. ’82 chemical engineering; and Judith Resnik, Ph.D. ’77 electrical engineering.

Through real-life stories, the book seeks to provide inspiration and encouragement for young women to pursue careers in engineering.

Lacey now serves as a program executive director for personnel at the Department of Defense and currently serves on the Clark School Board of Visitors. Walker was a project manager for the Woodrow Wilson Bridge Project and is now starting her own business. Duong works at the Naval Ordnance Station in Indian Head, Md., where she designed the infamous “bunker-buster” bomb. Resnik went on to become an astronaut and perished in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.

The book, a project of the organization Extraordinary Women Engineers, will be launched at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 21.

February 17, 2006

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